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information literacies


09:18 am, rainabloom
reblogged
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Citation Obsession? Get Over It!

mimisaurus:

girlwithalessonplan:

Bibliographic citation has apparently eclipsed perfect grammar and the five-paragraph theme as the preoccupation of persnickety professors.

What a colossal waste. Citation style remains the most arbitrary, formulaic, and prescriptive element of academic writing taught in American high schools and colleges. Now a sacred academic shibboleth, citation persists despite the incredibly high cost-benefit ratio of trying to teach students something they (and we should also) recognize as relatively useless to them as developing writers.

—Kurt Schick

I will never think teaching MLA citation is a waste of time.  I don’t make it 50% of the paper by any means, but it’s an important task to get them to think critically about the text they are looking at.  Some kids have no idea what type of source they are looking at; they just assume “it’s a website.”

But is a newspaper or magazine article?  A blog post?  An online encyclopedia?  Teaching MLA citation is a step in getting them to look at the parts that make a source; then they can decide if it’s credible.

All my love for MLA.

One of the key concepts I teach in my class is citation - when to cite, how to cite, why to cite. I spend weeks teaching students how to cite different types of sources while they learn how to locate relevant information in said sources. As is noted above, if you learn how to cite, you learn how to think about the different parts of a source, to contemplate the name of the author, the date of publication, etc. It requires you to note things that undergraduates are otherwise inclined to ignore. Moreover, citation is a gesture of respect and a tangible link in the chain of research. I tell my students that citing things shows where they live, what they know, and that they, in fact, have done the legwork to earn the right to speak on a given topic.

Unfortunately, citation is not the “preoccupation of persnickety professors” (nice alliteration, though). Most professors pay only cursory attention to the issue, allowing students to commit academic misconduct and perform lazy, indifferent research. The reasons for this are varied, but the two most prominent, I think, are that professors simply lack time to focus on such things and that professors themselves often do not know how to cite correctly or conduct proper research.

(Source: visualturn)


12:23 pm, rainabloom
reblogged
2,173 notes
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michaelzimmer:

rainabloom:

wilwheaton:

It only takes 20 minutes for the NYT to shift the blame. 
After allowing them onto the bridge, police cut off and arrested dozens of Occupy Wall Street protesters.
became
In a tense showdown over the East River, police arrested hundreds of Occupy Wall Street demonstrators after they marched onto the bridge’s Brooklyn=bound roadway.
Don’t let this simply vanish, people. Don’t let them get away with this. Force the NYT to own this, and accept responsibility for lying to their readers, to protect the 1%.
They’re terrified of us.
They know that we’re coming for them.
This is only the beginning.
(image via Reddit. Quote via Daily Kos)

Would adding this to a lecture on political literacy in my 101 course be too much?

Folks, there is the real possibility that new facts emerged, and thus the story changed.   And while the first version makes a claim that implicates the police, the 2nd merely states the fact of the arrests, leaving any blame or intent out altogether. It’s not so much a shift, as the removal of an attempt at placing blame.
Not justifyin’; lust sayin’.

There is a really interesting response to this circulating on Tumblr right now where a blogger takes an educated guess at what happened here from a journalistic perspective. I’m going to have to ask Dave to provide us with a link, since I don’t know where it lives, but the short version is that the story changed because of incoming information and the article basically being written in real time on the NYT’s site. I read it this morning and appreciated what she was saying. I assume that her assessment is correct.
That being said, the way the story evolved looks bad to a layperson who is sympathetic to the protestors. That alone is worth noting, without the hyperbole, as a gateway to a discussion about how journalism works on the web. Again, it might be a useful conversation for me to have with my students.

michaelzimmer:

rainabloom:

wilwheaton:

It only takes 20 minutes for the NYT to shift the blame. 

After allowing them onto the bridge, police cut off and arrested dozens of Occupy Wall Street protesters.

became

In a tense showdown over the East River, police arrested hundreds of Occupy Wall Street demonstrators after they marched onto the bridge’s Brooklyn=bound roadway.

Don’t let this simply vanish, people. Don’t let them get away with this. Force the NYT to own this, and accept responsibility for lying to their readers, to protect the 1%.

They’re terrified of us.

They know that we’re coming for them.

This is only the beginning.

(image via Reddit. Quote via Daily Kos)

Would adding this to a lecture on political literacy in my 101 course be too much?

Folks, there is the real possibility that new facts emerged, and thus the story changed.   And while the first version makes a claim that implicates the police, the 2nd merely states the fact of the arrests, leaving any blame or intent out altogether. It’s not so much a shift, as the removal of an attempt at placing blame.

Not justifyin’; lust sayin’.

There is a really interesting response to this circulating on Tumblr right now where a blogger takes an educated guess at what happened here from a journalistic perspective. I’m going to have to ask Dave to provide us with a link, since I don’t know where it lives, but the short version is that the story changed because of incoming information and the article basically being written in real time on the NYT’s site. I read it this morning and appreciated what she was saying. I assume that her assessment is correct.

That being said, the way the story evolved looks bad to a layperson who is sympathetic to the protestors. That alone is worth noting, without the hyperbole, as a gateway to a discussion about how journalism works on the web. Again, it might be a useful conversation for me to have with my students.

(Source: dailykos.com)


09:28 am, rainabloom
reblogged
5 notes
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infoneer-pulse:

Digital Life - Steal this report: college plagiarism up, says Pew report

You may know of it among your college friends, or if you’re a parent, among your kids’ friends: plagiarism is becoming as common as Wi-Fi connections at coffee shops.
The Pew Research Center, in conjunction with the Chronicle of Higher Education, recently surveyed 1,055 college presidents from two- to four-year schools, private and public. More than half of those top officials said they’ve seen an increase in plagiarism in the past 10 years. Nearly all of them say computers and the Internet have played a major role in the rise in stealing others work and claiming it as their own

» via Today

Skeptical librarian is skeptical.
I think it’s easier to catch students plagiarizing now. I think it’s easier for students to copy and paste blocks of text from websites, articles, and electronic books into their own work. But I think it’s easiest of all to blame the internet for this problem, rather than taking a long, hard look at why the students don’t know any better or think they can get away with it in the first place.
The students in my information literacy course do not plagiarize more than once. When I catch them doing it, I confront them directly and explain the implications of their actions. We talk about academic misconduct, respect for the work of others, and remix culture. We talk about it being perfectly okay that they cannot yet write like the person with the PhD who wrote the scholarly article they found on their topic. We talk about the fact that college is hard and research takes time, so they never make the mistake of trying to write a paper the day before it’s due, a choice that often leads to plagiarism.
A university where the culture and coursework do not support these kinds of conversations is asking for students to commit plagiarism. It’s not the fault of the students and it’s certainly not the fault of the technology.

infoneer-pulse:

Digital Life - Steal this report: college plagiarism up, says Pew report

You may know of it among your college friends, or if you’re a parent, among your kids’ friends: plagiarism is becoming as common as Wi-Fi connections at coffee shops.

The Pew Research Center, in conjunction with the Chronicle of Higher Education, recently surveyed 1,055 college presidents from two- to four-year schools, private and public. More than half of those top officials said they’ve seen an increase in plagiarism in the past 10 years. Nearly all of them say computers and the Internet have played a major role in the rise in stealing others work and claiming it as their own

» via Today

Skeptical librarian is skeptical.

I think it’s easier to catch students plagiarizing now. I think it’s easier for students to copy and paste blocks of text from websites, articles, and electronic books into their own work. But I think it’s easiest of all to blame the internet for this problem, rather than taking a long, hard look at why the students don’t know any better or think they can get away with it in the first place.

The students in my information literacy course do not plagiarize more than once. When I catch them doing it, I confront them directly and explain the implications of their actions. We talk about academic misconduct, respect for the work of others, and remix culture. We talk about it being perfectly okay that they cannot yet write like the person with the PhD who wrote the scholarly article they found on their topic. We talk about the fact that college is hard and research takes time, so they never make the mistake of trying to write a paper the day before it’s due, a choice that often leads to plagiarism.

A university where the culture and coursework do not support these kinds of conversations is asking for students to commit plagiarism. It’s not the fault of the students and it’s certainly not the fault of the technology.


09:21 am, rainabloom
reblogged
36 notes
quote
90 percent of people in their studies don’t know how to use CTRL/Command F to find a word in a document or web page! I probably use that trick 20 times per day and yet the vast majority of people don’t use it at all. “90 percent of the US Internet population does not know that. This is on a sample size of thousands,” Russell said. “I do these field studies and I can’t tell you how many hours I’ve sat in somebody’s house as they’ve read through a long document trying to find the result they’re looking for. At the end I’ll say to them, ‘Let me show one little trick here,’ and very often people will say, ‘I can’t believe I’ve been wasting my life!’”

Crazy: 90 Percent of People Don’t Know How to Use CTRL F - Alexis Madrigal - Technology - The Atlantic (via infoneer-pulse)

A;SLDKFJA;SLDKFJAS;DLKFJASD

(via michaelzimmer)

I regularly run searches on the projector screen while my students (undergraduates) watch. At least once a semester, when I CTRL+F something, the whole room will chorus “What did you just do?” So we have a little 45-second lesson on CTRL+F. After that, I see them use it constantly.


05:22 pm, rainabloom
reblogged
175 notes
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When the Chinese government is proud of you? it is time to step back and re-evaluate your choices.
Activists? Scholars? Esp. those in the UK? Get on this and get loud.
thedailywhat:

Bigger Brother of the Day: MI5, the British intelligence agency normally tasked with hunting down terrorists, will collaborate with the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) to assist police in locating individuals suspected of using social networking services to orchestrate looting raids.
The agencies will employ their advanced technologies to track down alleged instigators using intercepted BlackBerry Messenger broadcasts that police were unable to decrypt or trace.
In related news, two men in their early twenties were sentenced today by a court in Cheshire to four years in prison for inciting local “riot events” via Facebook. “You sought to take advantage of crime elsewhere and transpose it to the peaceful streets of Northwich,” Judge Elgan Edwards QC said during sentencing. “No one actually turned up due to the prompt and efficient actions of police in using modern policing.”
Meanwhile, Chinese state media published words of praise for UK PM David Cameron’s proposed banning of social network users for appearing to plot criminal behavior, saying “Britain’s new attitude will help appease the quarrels between East and West over the future management of the Internet.”
[guardian: 1,2 / slashdot / image: techdirt.]

When the Chinese government is proud of you? it is time to step back and re-evaluate your choices.

Activists? Scholars? Esp. those in the UK? Get on this and get loud.

thedailywhat:

Bigger Brother of the Day: MI5, the British intelligence agency normally tasked with hunting down terrorists, will collaborate with the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) to assist police in locating individuals suspected of using social networking services to orchestrate looting raids.

The agencies will employ their advanced technologies to track down alleged instigators using intercepted BlackBerry Messenger broadcasts that police were unable to decrypt or trace.

In related news, two men in their early twenties were sentenced today by a court in Cheshire to four years in prison for inciting local “riot events” via Facebook. “You sought to take advantage of crime elsewhere and transpose it to the peaceful streets of Northwich,” Judge Elgan Edwards QC said during sentencing. “No one actually turned up due to the prompt and efficient actions of police in using modern policing.”

Meanwhile, Chinese state media published words of praise for UK PM David Cameron’s proposed banning of social network users for appearing to plot criminal behavior, saying “Britain’s new attitude will help appease the quarrels between East and West over the future management of the Internet.”

[guardian: 1,2 / slashdot / image: techdirt.]


10:31 am, rainabloom
reblogged
985 notes
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thedailywhat:

This Won’t End Well of the Day: Speaking before  parliament, UK PM David Cameron said he has ordered an inquiry into the  possibility of banning users from social networks such as Twitter and  Facebook if it is determined that they are planning to engage in  criminal behavior.
“Free flow of information can be used for  good. But it can also be used for ill,” Cameron said. “And when people  are using social media for violence we need to stop them. So we are  working with the police, the intelligence services and industry to look  at whether it would be right to stop people communicating via these  websites and services when we know they are plotting violence, disorder  and criminality.”
Cameron added that he asked the police “if they need any other new powers.”
Home  Secretary Theresa May will hold meetings with representatives from  Facebbok, Twitter, and RIM to discuss their role in preventing future  riots. “All of them should think about their responsibility and about  taking down those images,” Cameron said in reference to Facebook and  Twitter posts he believes could incite further unrest.
[guardian / photo: emilyjackett.]

Are persons in positions of power this hell-bent on pretending that they’re not part of the system that bears some responsibility for what’s happened in London? Does David Cameron honestly believe that stopping people from communicating on Facebook and Twitter is going to do anything at all? Is he and anyone who agrees with him truly this ignorant about how people interact online? Do they realize how many heads this hydra has?

thedailywhat:

This Won’t End Well of the Day: Speaking before parliament, UK PM David Cameron said he has ordered an inquiry into the possibility of banning users from social networks such as Twitter and Facebook if it is determined that they are planning to engage in criminal behavior.

“Free flow of information can be used for good. But it can also be used for ill,” Cameron said. “And when people are using social media for violence we need to stop them. So we are working with the police, the intelligence services and industry to look at whether it would be right to stop people communicating via these websites and services when we know they are plotting violence, disorder and criminality.”

Cameron added that he asked the police “if they need any other new powers.”

Home Secretary Theresa May will hold meetings with representatives from Facebbok, Twitter, and RIM to discuss their role in preventing future riots. “All of them should think about their responsibility and about taking down those images,” Cameron said in reference to Facebook and Twitter posts he believes could incite further unrest.

[guardian / photo: emilyjackett.]

Are persons in positions of power this hell-bent on pretending that they’re not part of the system that bears some responsibility for what’s happened in London? Does David Cameron honestly believe that stopping people from communicating on Facebook and Twitter is going to do anything at all? Is he and anyone who agrees with him truly this ignorant about how people interact online? Do they realize how many heads this hydra has?


03:57 pm, rainabloom
7 notes
text
"The Metropolitan Police warned over ‘ill-informed speculation’ on social networking sites of further problems."

Source.

It’s Sunday and it’s August, so I don’t really want to go down the reading-my-research-interests-into-everything rabbit hole right now, but note this quote. Note that the Pentagon wants to track and even shape social networking trends and that the government in my state eventually began monitoring the activity of anti-Walker protestors on the #wiunion Twitter hashtag. We’d be foolish not to expect this (or even to suggest that there’s something inherently wrong with it), but those who wish to engage in online activism or gather information from demonstrators and citizens on the ground should be aware of this trend. Persons who have an interest in information policy and/or literacies should be responding to and commenting upon our government’s apparent increased interest in the online political lives of its citizens.